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5 Hispanic-Owned Businesses in the Corridor that Live Wildly

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Diversity is part of what makes Florida, Florida — as these small businesses showcase.

Florida is a vibrant place with people and cultures as diverse as the flora and fauna in the Corridor itself. In fact, more than a quarter of Florida’s residents are Hispanic, and Spanish is the second-most spoken language in the state.

The Florida State Hispanic Chamber of Commerce estimates there are more than 600,000 Hispanic-owned businesses in the Sunshine State. We’ve rounded up a handful that do good for the environment — and the community — across the Corridor.

Keel & Curley Winery at Keel Farms

It’s wine o’clock somewhere! Keel & Curley Winery is part of a family- and Hispanic-owned, sustainable farm in Plant City. It offers an unparalleled selection of wines and beers, from blueberry rosé to strawberry shortcake, plus frozen wine slushies. In addition to hosting weekly trivia and live music, they also hold several fundraising events for local and global nonprofits. Before “wine-ing down” at the farm, take a hike on the short nature trail or paddle along Mac Lake at Colt Creek State Park.

 Verde Market

Verde Market in South Florida takes sustainability to the next level. This Hispanic-owned, zero-waste grocery store sells more than 300 plant-based, locally sourced organic items in bulk — from laundry detergent to nut milks. Verde Market revolutionizes a new way to shop by asking customers to bring their own containers to fill with items, and then charges based on weight. By shopping here, you can feel good about reducing waste across the state— and directly making a difference for Florida’s environment.

Live Wildly Tip: Verde Market accepts compost on any day of the week at their three locations in Miami and Fort Lauderdale.

 GROU

Florida food connoisseur Isabel, or @comidisa on Instagram, recommended this family- and Latino-owned co-working space meets coffee shop in Coral Gables. GROU, which combines “grow,” “group” and “ground,” is on a mission to use coffee to promote local brands and create a space for small businesses to gather and grow. The coffee shop features items from more than 60 local bakers, farmers and producers. It also supports more than 80 local businesses and freelancers with rentable offices, desks and meeting rooms. After picking up a coffee or enjoying an affogato (it’s Miami’s first affogato bar!), head to the nearby Everglades for a hike along the Anhinga Trail.

Naked Bar Soap

This Orlando-based, women- and Puerto Rican- and Dominican Republican-owned shop sells all natural soaps and beauty products. Only “naked” ingredients — such as sustainable palm oil, coconut oil, essential oils and spices — go into these goods. Besides soap, they also sell bath bombs, deodorant, body scrubs and toners. Their soaps are perfect to pack for your next camping trip to Wekiwa Springs State Park, just outside of downtown Orlando.

Live Wildly Tip: Naked Bar Soap’s Birthday Sugar Scrub is a must-try! You can only buy it online or at various pop-ups throughout Orlando.

Third House Books

In the heart of Gainesville lives this Hispanic-owned independent bookstore. With just 300 titles in its inventory, Third House Books focuses on small, independent presses and marginalized voices. While you may not find the latest trendy book here, you will discover a hand-picked, diverse array of authors. We recommend purchasing a new novel then heading out to Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park — only 30 minutes away — to dive into your new adventure under a shaded pavilion beside Lake Wauburg.


Do you have a favorite Hispanic-owned business near the Corridor? Let us know on social @LiveWildlyFL

Did you hear? Live Wildly will now be producing content in English and Spanish! Learn more

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Econfina Creek
Photo by Carlton Ward, Jr.
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